V is for green: virid, verdant, veridian, verdigris, verdure, vert Poem: Verdant Exile

commove in pale green

Today’s new word:

There are so many great V words. I may have some fun today along the lines of Margaret Atwood’s A Trio of Tolerable Tales and THE SESAME STREET LIBRARY and write a story about Vesicant Veronica’s vitriolic vitrifaction or Vespoid Vernon’s vespiary.

 

For the present poetry purposes, however, I’ve stuck to the V words that are green:

virid adj. green or verdant

verdant adj 1. green with vegetation; covered with growing plants or grass 2. of the color green 3. inexperienced; unsophisticated

viridian n. a long-lasting, bluish-green pigment, consisting of a hydrated oxide of chromium.

verdigris n. a green or bluish patina formed on copper, brass, or bronze surfaces exposed to the atmosphere for long periods of time, consisting principally of basic copper sulfate.

verdure n. 1. greenness, especially of fresh, flourishing vegetation. 2. green vegetation, especially grass or herbage. 3. freshness in general; flourishing condition; vigor.

vert n. English Forest Law. 1. vegetation bearing green leaves in a forest and capable of serving as a cover for deer. 2. the right to cut such vegetation.
n. Heraldry . the tincture, or color, green.
adj. Heraldry . of the tincture green: a lion vert.

National Poetry Writing Month prompt:

Write a poem that:

  • Is specific to a season
  • Uses imagery that relates to all five senses (sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell)
  • Includes a rhetorical question, (like Keats’ “where are the songs of spring?”)

Writer’s Digest April PAD (poem a day) challenge:

Write an exile poem.

My poem

Verdant Exile

Verdant exile in idyllic, virid splendor
springing and bursting verdure
an umbrella of viridian and vert
a bucolic shunning
far enough from everywhere to be too far
but not quite far enough
shoots like verdigris change the color of days
from gray to green

Does spring tease on purpose?
enticing the sower with warm kisses
then freezing the seedlings in a blanket of frost
or washing them away in muddy rivers from heavy rains
the viridian umbrella has holes
that let the rain through
the wet exile digs again

Reading

Today’s poetry book for inspiration is A Small Story about the Sky by Alberto Rios.

Happy Reading and Writing!

 

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